Bronze Tiger in Animation - A Retrospective

RoyalRubble

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To celebrate the premiere of the new animated feature Batman: Soul of the Dragon (which can be discussed here), I figured it would be a good time to look back on some of the main characters' previous animated appearances. If everything goes according to plan, you might see more threads like this over the next few weeks, but no promises. This thread will focus on Bronze Tiger, one of the top martial arts fighters in the DC Universe.

Admittedly, there's not much to cover here, as the character had only a few appearances in animated projects over the years, but I think there is still enough for a decent sized retrospective. While these articles may not be as detailed or well-written as some of my previous retrospectives (due to various reasons, including but not limited to time constraints), I hope you will still enjoy reading through them. And keep in mind these are just my opinions. Feel free to share your own thoughts, comments or even point out any possible errors in my write-ups below! Most of the images in this thread appear courtesy of The World's Finest and updates will be posted every Tuesday, if all goes well. I have to admit I am a bit behind on all this, I haven't finished writing the second article at the time I am posting this, so there might be a longer break between updates, but I wanted to have something ready for the movie's Digital release.

Bronze Tiger (real name: Benjamin Turner) made his debut in a novel written by Dennis O"Neil and Jim Berry, before making his proper debut in comics in 1975, in the pages of Richard Dragon, Kung Fu Fighter #1 thanks to the team of O'Neil, Berry and Leopoldo Duranona. As a child Ben killed a burglar who attacked his parents (imagine that, Bruce and Barry!), and ever since then tired to control his inner rage. He found studying martial arts could help him and as such years later he finds himself learning from O-Sensei, a master of the martial arts. There he also meets fellow recruit Richard Dragon and the two would later team-up on various missions as part of a secret organization. Eventually Ben would also get mixed-up with the League of Assassins (after his fiance is murdered by one of its members). Ben is also brain-washed and as such joins the League and takes on the persona of the Bronze Tiger. He is eventually retrieved by the Suicide Squad, and joins this team as well. Throughout the years he has also been a part of the Justice League Task Force, making him more of an anti-hero than a villain. Despite not having any super-human powers, his mastery of the martial arts makes him a formidable fighter feared by many.

His first animated appearance was on Batman: The Brave and the Bold, an animated series starring Batman (obviously), based on the comic book series the Brave and the Bold. Produced by James Tucker and Michael Jelenic, this was basically a team-up show, with Batman appearing in every episode alongside various other characters from the DC Universe. It premiered in fall 2008 on the Cartoon Network, and lasted for 65 episodes, and it also received a DTV movie a couple of years ago, in a pretty surprising turn of events. Mostly depicting adventures either adapted or inspired by some of the weirdest comic book stories from the Silver Age of comics, The Brave and the Bold still managed to be a pretty awesome show overall, though the quality of the episodes varies from time to time. I initially didn't really care for the show but I got to admit it did grow on me along the way and all in all I find it very enjoyable. I think it's pretty amazing how many characters they managed to feature throughout the show's run, and pretty much every character that showed up proved to be very entertaining. It was also my introduction to many of the more obscure characters of the DC Universe, some of which I never even heard of before.


Bronze Tiger made his debut during the show's first season, in the episode titled "Return of the Fearsome Fangs!" which premiered in 2009. Here he was voiced by Gary Sturgis and was presented as an old acquaintance of Batman's. Years earlier both Ben Turner and Bruce Wayne trained in the martial arts under the guidance of Master Wong Fei. They both excelled in their studies as did their class-mates and rivals, Fox, Vulture and Shark - a pretty unique take on the somewhat obscure and kind of lackluster team of villains, the Terrible Trio. Ben was a gifted fighter but also a very proud one, who was usually annoyed by Wong Fei's lessons and refused to bow in front of his Master. Eventually, he left the Temple believing he has learned all he needed. In present times, Ben became the protector of a small village in China. As the Bronze Tiger, he enjoyed fighting and defeating all challengers, until Batman shows up asking for his help in protecting Wong Fei's Temple.

The Terrible Trio had murdered their old Master after allying themselves with a Shadow Clan of Ninjas, wishing to obtain a mystical totem from the Temple. Wong Fei's spirit managed to contact Batman and explain the situation to him, and advised him not to bother in reaching out to Bronze Tiger. As one would expect, to make things more interesting and get the story to move along nicely, Batman did seek out Ben's help. But before agreeing to team up, Batman and Bronze Tiger engage in a brief fight, as is often the case in this kind of stories. Batman is seemingly out-matched, but then reveals to Tiger a lesson he missed out on learning after leaving the Temple - "When out-matched, cheat!". I imagine this isn't limited to martial arts, and would work well in just about any other field.

Batman and Bronze Tiger fight the Terrible Trio and their army of shadow ninjas, and have a chance of protecting the mystic Totem but Tiger is more interested in fighting his old rival Fox, and due to his stubbornness the villains manage to get their hands on the Totem. As a result are transformed into creatures based on the masks they were wearing - becoming Fox, Vulture and Shark mutants and obviously getting power boosts at the same time. Fox beats up Tiger a little more but doesn't kill him, letting him live knowing he could have saved the world - and his village - but failed to do so.

With the villains wreaking havoc in Hong Kong, Batman and Bronze Tiger once again try to stop them but the latter seemingly admits he is no match for them. Ben realizes his pride and stubbornness have gotten him into all kinds of trouble and agrees to bow down in front of Fox, if he promises to spare his village. It's not too surprising to see this is all a ruse, an excuse to get close enough to his opponent and kick the Totem from his hands. It's also a nice moment seeing Ben so self-aware, and using the "cheating" lesson he just learned. With the Totem in their possession now, Batman and Tiger also transform into Bat and Tiger creatures respectively, and are now strong enough to win the fight. Their designs look nice, for some reason Bronze Tiger's transformed form reminded me of Rath from the Ben 10 franchise but that could be only because they are both humanoid tigers. Batman's form was reminiscent of Man-Bat, I guess there are only so many ways you could draw a bat-creature. Here the story gets a bit too silly, but it does still have some sort of charm or something, and is pretty entertaining. While Batman is taking care of the shadow ninjas, Bronze Tiger fights Fox in a pretty awesome scene, where he manages to break both his opponent's arms and legs. It was satisfying seeing him settle this score with his long-time rival.

In the end, Bronze Tiger decides to stay at the Temple to keep protecting it, and plans on re-opening its school as well. Batman declares their Master would be honored by all this (but I guess we'll never really know the truth). All seems settled, apart from one minor thing - Batman still owes him a rematch. Sadly we don't get to see this fight, but it is a fun way to end the story. Overall it was an entertaining adventure with a pretty good story-line and some cool and exciting action scenes. The episode played around with some martial arts movie tropes, which is always nice to see. The fight choreography was also well done, which should be the case for all animated martial arts shows. Bronze Tiger was handled pretty well and they did manage to fit in his basic back-story into the episode. I also liked how for a change, the Terrible Trio, or at least Fox had more of a rivalry with him, instead of them being Batman rogues.


Bronze Tiger only had a few other, minor appearances on the show usually being part of an ensemble cast (for example, during Starro the Conqueror's invasion arc). With everything else going on in those episodes, there's really not much to talk about in regards to him. I think I covered his most notable appearance well enough and it's cool the show had at least one episode to spotlight Ben Turner. While the series managed to feature a lot of characters, not all of them received this same treatment. All things considered, I liked Bronze Tiger's portrayal on the show. Seeing him in action was cool, but then there was some character development in there as well, which made things more enjoyable. His design was good, nothing about it really stands out to me, but I did like how his debut episode had three different designs for the character. It would have been nice seeing him have another, larger role on the show. I suppose one could say there wasn't really much more they could do with Ben after this adventure, in regards to his character arc, but even so having him team-up with Batman again for a teaser would have been pretty cool.

Next: Hell to Pay!
 

RoyalRubble

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Bronze Tiger's next animated appearance was in Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay, a direct-to-video feature released in 2018 as part of the DC Universe Animated Original Movies line. It was directed by Sam Liu, and was also the final such movie written by the legendary Alan Burnett prior to his retirement (although at least one more movie written by him beforehand was only completed and released after his decision to retire). As the title suggests, the movie focuses on the Suicide Squad and you can expect to see a lot of violence in there, as well as a focus on mostly villains or at the very least anti-heroes. To make things even more fun, this was among the first titles to actually earn its R rating, and I think the movie takes advantage of this as it manages to get quite brutal at times. So, before going any further, a couple of warnings in regards to this article - it might mention some pretty gruesome details about the way some characters meet their ends, and also contains more than a few spoilers for this line of movies. It's kind of hard discussing it and Bronze Tiger's role, without spoiling some of the surprises the film contains.


The movie focuses mostly on Floyd Lawton, a.k.a. Deadshot (voiced by Christian Slater), who seems to be the main character in most Suicide Squad adaptations, either animated or live-action which seems appropriate given he is usually associated with the group. The same could be said about Captain Boomerang and fan-favorite Harley Quinn (who seems a bit over-exposed lately, but that is a topic for another time), but Deadshot probably gets the most screen-time here, as well as sort of a happy ending after all he's been through. Although that seems to change a little in the tie-in comic for the movie, which I won't really cover here since it's not animated and doesn't really feature the character this retrospective is all about, but I thought it would be worth a quick mention.

After Deadshot, Bronze Tiger also gets his fair share of screen-time. Here Ben Turner was voiced by Billy Brown and was introduced as a former CIA agent turned vigilante, currently incarcerated at the Belle Reve Correctional Institute. As per Amanda Waller's description, he's probably the greatest martial artist in the world, and she did consider putting him in charge of the Squad, but Ben's vow to not kill innocent people made her pick Floyd as team leader for this one mission. Their mission, which they are forced to accept, is to retrieve a magical artifact, a "Get Out of Hell Free" card which as its title implies, sends the person holding it when they die directly to Heaven bypassing Hell. The problem is, it can only work once, so as one would imagine a lot of people would be interested in obtaining it.

Apart from the Suicide Squad, two other super-villains are after this card - Vandal Savage and Professor Zoom. Savage wishes to have the card inside him, giving him some extra-protection considering he is immortal, while Zoom's reason is a bit more surprising. Or at least, his back-story, which also connects the movie to some some of the events from a previous feature, Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox, from 2013. He was shot in the head by an alternate version of Batman (and still has the wound to prove it!), but using the Speed Force he extended his final moments for a few days or weeks, although his speed is affected by all this. I thought adding a callback to that previous story was a pretty cool and unexpected twist. Flashpoint Paradox was among the first of these animated movies to really show some brutal fight scenes, but Hell to Pay takes things even further.

As for Bronze Tiger, he gets some pretty cool moments throughout the movie. While most fight scenes feature the entire team in action, his martial arts skills are put to the test when he goes up against the likes of Blockbuster, Scandal Savage (and her girlfriend, Knockout) or Zoom himself, ultimately. But there's also some conflict within the Suicide Squad (as usual, some of the team-mates can't stand each other), which leads to a showdown between Tiger and Deadshot. Then, we also have some more philosophical talk with the villains pondering if the magical card actually works, and their views on the Afterlife. Ben's beliefs in that only God could save any of them from damnation for all the blood they spilled really makes for a unique moment in an otherwise action-packed movie. It adds a few more layers to these guys and in a way makes them more sympathetic, despite all of the harm they did and people they killed. This is probably the most intriguing version of Bronze Tiger to be animated, so far. As a head's up, I would also like to add I don't wish for this thread to turn into a debate on this or other religious subjects, either.

Bronze Tiger: You joke about Heaven and Hell, Deadshot. But trust me, they exist. There's not a morning goes by I don't get up wondering if this will be my Judgement Day. Will I end up with the woman I love or face a lake of hell fire with the same vermin that brought me down? The only thing any of us can hope for is divine intervention. Only through the grace of God can we be saved from eternal damnation for all the blood we spilled. Everything else is just talk.

The movie also briefly touches on Ben's backstory, with him mentioning how his fiance Miyoshi was murdered by a member of the League of Assassins (*cough*Deathstroke*cough*). As a side-note, in a funny meta-sort of way, this works as a prelude to Deathstroke: Knights & Dragons, the movie I will cover in the next article, with the rivalry between these two characters, although I realize these features aren't even supposed to be set in the same continuity. It's even weirder when you consider, in the next movie Deathstroke is supposed to be slightly more sympathetic and Tiger is an amoral antagonist. But, getting back to Hell to Pay...

Bronze Tiger is also appointed Squad leader for a while, after Waller demotes Deadshot, but following Ben's severe injuries during a bombing Floyd reclaims the position. Although injured, Ben still manages to stand up to Zoom even if only for a little while. Zoom uses his speed and a knife to inflict a thousand cuts all over Ben's already injured body, but less than that are needed to take him down. Ben does manage to get in one last surprise attack, slicing off Zoom's fingers and thus also taking away his magical card (Deadhot then proceeds to gun down the speedster, causing him to fade away from existence). With Ben dying, Floyd lets him hold the card given his beliefs. I suppose what happens next is left to interpretation by the viewers, but it did seem as if the trick worked and Ben found his redemption in the end. It's a pretty nice way to end it, although I would have liked to see more from this version of Bronze Tiger in other movies as well.

I realize I am skipping over a lot of stuff that happens in the movie - a lot of other characters die, a few more double-crosses and betrayals, nudity, some male strippers and a pretty different take on Doctor Fate, among others. But I think I covered all that was needed to highlight Bronze Tiger's journey. As I mentioned this is probably my favorite animated take on the character, there's just something about it that works so well, from his design and voice acting to his portrayal. His fight choreography was also very well done, and for a change this time he could be a lot more brutal than in the previous cartoon he appeared in. Despite all the battles he takes part in, Ben still comes across as more moralized, for lack of a better word, than the others. He doesn't like being paired with assassins, such as the ones who killed his fiance. It makes him stand out in this roster of the Squad.

All in all, a pretty great movie, which I enjoyed despite the fact I am usually not that big of a fan of these overly violent features. The story just grabbed me, I guess, and some of the characters were developed well enough to make things more interesting. Plus, the action was intense and pretty entertaining as well. I enjoyed this more than the previous Suicide Squad movies - either the animated Assault on Arkham or the live-action movie from 2016, thanks in part to Bronze Tiger's inclusion. It remains to be seen how good the upcoming live-action movie will be, I have a feeling it will be better than the last one, but I also kind of tend to prefer DC Animated movies over most of their live-action efforts. Tiger doesn't seem to be part of that movie anyway (and the same goes for Deadshot), so that's one advantage Hell to Pay still has over it, I suppose. Soul of the Dragon does seem to be a strong contender for a better portrayal of Bronze Tiger, but I will talk more about that movie in a future article.

Next: Knights & Dragons!
 

Frontier

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Bronze Tiger was definitely a highlight of Hell to Pay for me. Depicting Ben's conviction, faith, and strength of character in contrast with the more self-serving and cynical villains was pretty fun, and he was an utter beast in combat. He even got his much-deserved happy ending :).

Billy Brown also did a great job voicing him. I believed in virtually everything Ben had to say because there was so much emotion and power in Brown's delivery :cool:.
 

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Deathstroke: Knights & Dragons was released in 2020, initially intended as a web-series on the CW Seed service (although only one 38 minutes long episode was released as such) before the full story was released in movie format on Digital and Home-Media a few months later. Written by J.M. DeMatteis, the movie tells a pretty good story focusing on Deathstroke the Terminator (or Slade, if you're more familiar with that name), voiced by Michael Chiklis, and showing how messed-up his family is. Although some of his background and family issues were altered here from the comics, it still works. Overall though, while I liked the art style used here and did kind of enjoy some of the action scenes (despite how brutal they were) and more emotional moments, I thought the movie was pretty disappointing. I wouldn't say it's a bad movie, I just didn't care too much for it. It seems to drag on a bit too long, and the story seems to get a little messy towards the end (and not only because of the bloody action scenes!). It's not something I am interested in watching too often, and as such I only fast-forwarded through the movie this time to cover Bronze Tiger's appearances.

Also of note, the movie seems to be a stand-alone story, and doesn't share the same continuity as other animated (or live-action) projects. Most of the previous DC Comics cartoons released on the CW Seed, such as Vixen or Freedom Fighters: The Ray, were supposed to be set in the so-called "Arrowverse" (started by the Arrow TV series back in 2012, as I presume most people here know). Ultimately I don't think squeezing this movie into that continuity would have helped it too much. Knights & Dragons being its own thing also allows it to play around a bit with Deathstroke's mythos, instead of having it adhere to whatever already happened to the character in the live-action shows.

During the movie Slade crosses paths multiple times with the secret terrorist organization known as H.I.V.E. and its operatives. One of them is none other than Bronze Tiger, although he is presented as a much more villainous character in this story, especially after reading through the previous articles of this thread. Here Tiger's voice was provided by Delbert Hunt, and he only shows up for a couple of scenes in the entire movie. His first fight with Slade results in the loss of one of his arms, despite the claims that Tiger's skills were legendary, it seems Deathstroke was just a little better. There's really not much to comment on as far as their confrontation goes, although it does set the stage nicely for Slade's conflict with H.I.V.E. in its aftermath.


Bronze Tiger next appears after a time-skip, ten years have passed within the movie, as he is now located in Kasnia where he is hailed as a hero of their revolution, leading a small army of rebels. His business as a mercenary has been going well, until Slade drops by looking for information about H.I.V.E., and its leaders. As one would expect Tiger isn't willing to cooperate which leads to another fight between the two. It's entertaining enough, probably a little more intense than their previous encounter, but it has a similar outcome - Tiger also loses the cybernetic arm he's been using to replace the one Slade cut off years earlier. Reluctantly Tiger also gives Slade info on where to find the villains he's been looking for, hoping he would meet his end by going after them. After Slade flies away in his jet, Tiger advises one of his men to not open fire on the jet. But Slade wasn't so kind, as he shoots a missile towards their camp, and this is the last we see of Bronze Tiger in the movie. I am not completely sure he actually died, but regardless he didn't play a part in the next scenes.

The rest of the movie focuses on Slade and his family - as I mentioned before, it does get a bit messy as it plays out. It's decent and does manage to deliver a pretty good story in the end, but I won't try and review the rest of it here. Bronze Tiger doesn't appear again, and coupled with the fact I didn't really care much for the movie to begin with, means this will have to do. I think I managed to cover Tiger's role well enough, but there's really not much to discuss here. On a side-note, I initially also considered writing a retrospective like this for Lady Shiva, who also shows up in this story, but her role in here is even smaller.

Apologies for the rather short article this time. Bronze Tiger's role here wasn't that big but it was decent. He served his purpose well enough, and did contribute to some pretty cool action scenes. It's probably the most villainous take on the character animated so far, which is kind of a nice change of pace but like I said before, it feels a bit off compared to his other animated appearances. There's really not a lot to comment about this take on the character, but I presume it must have its fans. Overall, I would say the movie is worth watching, even more so if you're a fan of Deathstroke, I suppose. Some of the other characters featured here (such as Tiger) don't really get too much screen-time, but help the story to move along nicely.

Next: Soul of the Dragon!
 

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Yeah, there's not really much to say about Bronze Tiger in the movie. Like a lot of the villain characters he was just a prominent "named" martial arts character they threw in there to give Deathstroke someone cool to fight, and in that respect he served his function...just not a very deep role :sweat:.
 

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Bronze Tiger's most recent animated appearance was in Batman: Soul of the Dragon, a DTV animated movie released earlier this year. Written by Jeremy Adams, directed by Sam Liu and produced by Bruce Timm, the movie places the Dark Knight and a few other famous martial artists from the DC Universe in the '70s, fighting the sinister Kobra Cult. As a word of warning, seeing as the movie is still relatively a recent release and as such not everyone might have watched it yet, note this article will contain Spoilers. In short, it's a very entertaining movie, with a pretty good story and focus on its main characters. The retro setting is also well done, I can't say I am a huge fan of the '70s (it was a little before my time) but can appreciate the effort put into re-creating that era. On top of that I have watched a number of movies from that era during my lifetime and have enjoyed them for the most part. And of course, the action scenes are also pretty exciting and reminiscent of various other movie genres of the time, most notably the ones starring Bruce Lee, or the "blaxploitation" features.

For a change, Soul of the Dragon focuses more on Ben Turner rather than his Bronze Tiger persona (although he is named as such in at least one scene). Similarly, the movie features Bruce Wayne more than Batman. It does help develop the characters a bit more, makes it more of a personal story. As in other projects, via flashbacks we see Bruce's training under the wise O-Sensei (voiced by James Hong) in Nanda Parbat. His fellow class-mates include Ben Turner, Lady Shiva and Richard Dragon, among others. Ben here was voiced by Michael Jai White, who previously played the same role of Bronze Tiger in live-action, on the Arrow TV series. According to O-Sensei, Ben is strong and fierce, and hopes that through his training he can find a way to control his temper... but it's still a work in progress. Other flashbacks also show more of their training, and how Bruce earned Ben's respect after the latter beats him up for eating the last of their rice. It's a pretty nice moment, which also touches on Ben's background a little, he's had a hard life as a kid as well, and had to fight to earn his place there. It might make Ben seem a little unlikable, but I think it fits in well with his anger issues mentioned earlier, and he does get better as the story progresses.


Their training ends when they learn of the gate to another dimension they had to protect and failed to do so, mainly because of another student - Rip Jagger, secretly a Kobra agent who betrays them. O-Sensei seemingly sacrifices himself in order to close the gate and keep Naga, the Serpent God locked away. The main story, set a few years after the students parted ways, begins with Richard Dragon (any similarity between him and Bruce Lee is purely co-incidental, I presume) learning the Kobra Cult has found the gate. He reaches out to Burce for help and also learns of his masked identity. They also seek out Lady Shiva, now a fearsome crime-lord who has the magical Stormbreaker... Soultaker... I mean, Soulbreaker Sword the Cult needs in order to open the gate. After a few encounters with the Cult and its fighters, the trio also recruits Ben.

Ben, who now looks suspiciously like a mix of Jim Kelly (see Enter the Dragon) and Marvel Comics' Luke Cage, if that makes any sense. It's revealed that, in a way, Ben is actually responsible for the mess they are in now - after what happened to O-Sensei, Ben became sort of a vigilante and started tracking the Kobra Cult on his own, smashing their operations (and members) all over the world, making his way to their "Chosen One", Jeffrey Burr. However, Jeffrey was just a child, and Ben couldn't bring himself to kill him. Ben then decided to open his own martial arts school, and taught and helped kids similar to how his Master once helped him. Jeffrey on the other hand, grew up to be the psychotic cult leader he is today, hell-bent on unleashing the Serpent God into our dimension.

There are a lot of action scenes to be found here, as with every good martial arts movie, and Ben does get in on the action as well. Whether he's fighting a mad scientist with snakes instead of arms, serpent monsters or even the evil Serpent God (possessing the body of O-Sensei, just to make things more dramatic), Ben still manages to shine through all of this. He gets beat up a lot, but still shines. That's not to say the other fighters don't get equal screen-time, or cool moments spread throughout the movie. Lady Shiva was probably the best character here, but alas, this retrospective is supposed to focus on Bronze Tiger.

As expected the heroes manage to defeat their opponents, but in a slightly surprising twist, they all end up on the other side of the gate, seemingly forced to fight against evil for all eternity. It's a pretty good way to finish the movie, I realize some might not like it too much and consider it a cliff-hanger or something along those lines, but I feel it works fine. It's more symbolic of the eternal fight between good and evil or however you want to interpret it. There might be a chance they would all still make it out of there, if a sequel ever gets made. I don't think it would diminish the effect of this ending, and I would love to see more of these characters in future movies.

Overall, the movie is a lot of fun. The fight scenes do get a little too violent at times (this movie is also rated R, after all...), but it doesn't feel nearly as bad as in other projects where they do stuff like this all the time. It's not really on par with the overly-violent Mortal Kombat Legends: Scorpion's Revenge animated movie from last year (also written by Jeremy Adams). A martial arts movie should probably feature some level of violence, anyway. The fight choreography here is well done, each character has some good moves and the overall effect is pretty impressive.


Ben Turner was also handled well in this movie. He's a well-rounded character and we do get to see some different sides to him amidst all the fighting. His design looks good, and the voice acting is solid as well. Michael Jai White had some good dialogue for the most part, and I didn't really mind the '70s slang sprinkled throughout the movie. He fits in well alongside the other characters, and the retro style also suits him. I understand some parallels can also be made to the Black Dynamite franchise, but I have to admit I never watched either the movie or animated series, so I cannot really comment any further on this.

It's also cool how this focuses more on Ben, and not his Bronze Tiger alter-ego. Everything about him seems to work surprisingly well in this movie. He was an enjoyable part of a very entertaining movie. Personally I still think the Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay version of the character would rank a bit higher, but this is a very close second. As I must have mentioned before, I would like to see more from either take of this character, though funnily enough both seem to be either a little dead or trapped in another dimension at the moment. And in the case of Hell to Pay bringing back that specific version of Tiger, would cheapen his whole redemption arc. I think there's probably a better chance of seeing a new animated version of Bronze Tiger, instead of revisiting one from a previous project.

And there you have it - a pretty much complete (even if I do say so myself) rundown of Ben Turner's appearances in cartoons for the past decade or so. There might have been a couple of other, minor cameos (Batman vs. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles comes to mind), but this should cover his most notable roles so far. I presume we haven't seen the last of Bronze Tiger, although I have no idea where the character might show up next. Being one of the top fighters in the DC Universe makes him a likely candidate for future projects, and I believe he has a better chance of appearing in another cartoon before another live-action outing. This thread will (hopefully) be updated from time to time, to cover more of Bronze Tiger's animated adventures, as they happen. I hope you all enjoyed reading through this, and remember feedback is always welcome.
 

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Found this from Reddit. Had to trim the original a bit. And yeah the guy in the 2nd half of this is the new Sokka actor.
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