C&C - Yashahime: Princess Half-Demon - "Inuyasha: Since Then" (SERIES PREMIERE) [6/26]

PicardMan

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Well whoever's saying it, it's not true. It seems like the classic case of fan nerds elevating the "seriousness" of the old thing they love in their mind in order to feel better about themselves for obsessing over a children's cartoon. Inuyasha is a children's cartoon, so is Yashahime. It's not like there's a lot of blood in Inuyasha (and when there is it's usually demon's blood, don't know how much that matters). But there's plenty of limb-slicing, live-burning, and even a bit of sex slavery in Yashahime, just like in the old show.

It is possible for both to be children's shows, but one being aimed at a younger audience than the other (example, Teen Titans Go compared to Teen Titans). As to how how much, if it all the show is dumbed down, that is a matter of debate, but there is at least visible less bloodshed (there were scenes of human bloodshed, but I remember the blood being purplish-brownish rather than the usual red. I remember that Texas A&M colored blood as Inuyasha's weird gimmicky censorship). Like all anime, Inuyasha and Yashahime are subject to the Doctor Who Effect, a phenomenon where a children's show from another country is seen as adult in foreign markets because the content is considered more complex or taboo in that foreign market. I'd say there's nothing wrong with liking Japanese children's cartoons and British science fiction shows as those are cornerstones of the adult geek crowd, but most of us know they are children's shows in their country of origin and don't really try to deny that.
 

WickedChild

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It is possible for both to be children's shows, but one being aimed at a younger audience than the other (example, Teen Titans Go compared to Teen Titans). As to how how much, if it all the show is dumbed down, that is a matter of debate, but there is at least visible less bloodshed (there were scenes of human bloodshed, but I remember the blood being purplish-brownish rather than the usual red. I remember that Texas A&M colored blood as Inuyasha's weird gimmicky censorship). Like all anime, Inuyasha and Yashahime are subject to the Doctor Who Effect, a phenomenon where a children's show from another country is seen as adult in foreign markets because the content is considered more complex or taboo in that foreign market. I'd say there's nothing wrong with liking Japanese children's cartoons and British science fiction shows as those are cornerstones of the adult geek crowd, but most of us know they are children's shows in their country of origin and don't really try to deny that.

Fair enough, but this show is no Teen Titans Go or anything remotely like it, in terms of the difference between it and its predecessor. Having slightly less blood doesn't change that. Rather than the absence of blood, I really feel the complete absence of romance is the far more substantial and important difference from the original.
 

SpaceCowboy

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It is possible for both to be children's shows, but one being aimed at a younger audience than the other (example, Teen Titans Go compared to Teen Titans). As to how how much, if it all the show is dumbed down, that is a matter of debate, but there is at least visible less bloodshed (there were scenes of human bloodshed, but I remember the blood being purplish-brownish rather than the usual red. I remember that Texas A&M colored blood as Inuyasha's weird gimmicky censorship).
The original manga was more violent than the TV show. I remember an early chapter where Inuyasha had his eye gouged out by Sesshomaru in the manga which was bloodless in the TV version of that scene. A different chapter had a demon tearing a man's head off that was changed to his neck getting broken in the anime.
Like all anime, Inuyasha and Yashahime are subject to the Doctor Who Effect, a phenomenon where a children's show from another country is seen as adult in foreign markets because the content is considered more complex or taboo in that foreign market. I'd say there's nothing wrong with liking Japanese children's cartoons and British science fiction shows as those are cornerstones of the adult geek crowd, but most of us know they are children's shows in their country of origin and don't really try to deny that.
Rumiko Takahashi's shows have had a history of this in the US. Her previous long-running cash cows, Urusei Yatsura and Ranma 1/2, had a fanbase in America that skewed older than their audience in Japan.
 

PicardMan

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The original manga was more violent than the TV show. I remember an early chapter where Inuyasha had his eye gouged out by Sesshomaru in the manga which was bloodless in the TV version of that scene. A different chapter had a demon tearing a man's head off that was changed to his neck getting broken in the anime.

I remember my encounter with the first volume of the manga in my high school library and being surprised by how gory it was (and a Kagome nude scene, nipples and all. Nothing like that's in the anime). Surprised it wasn't a target of book bans like a lot of other manga in the puritanical 00s (like Dragon Ball). I think Inuyasha was originally planned for Cartoon Network Toonami, but the iconic opening scene of him being impaled against a tree got the censors upset. To be fair, American standards for violence in children's cartoons might be even stricter now than in the 00s, considering that violent children's action cartoons have been purged from cable and are only on streaming. Inuyasha had to be aimed at an older audience because the tolerance for violence in American children's media is substantially lower than Japan's.

Rumiko Takahashi's shows have had a history of this in the US. Her previous long-running cash cows, Urusei Yatsura and Ranma 1/2, had a fanbase in America that skewed older than their audience in Japan.

I think that had more to do with sexual content than violence. In America, it's more corrupting of children to see female Ranma's nipples than any violence on prime time cop shows. America has a zero tolerance policy for nudity in children's media.
 

SpaceCowboy

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I remember my encounter with the first volume of the manga in my high school library and being surprised by how gory it was (and a Kagome nude scene, nipples and all. Nothing like that's in the anime). Surprised it wasn't a target of book bans like a lot of other manga in the puritanical 00s (like Dragon Ball). I think Inuyasha was originally planned for Cartoon Network Toonami, but the iconic opening scene of him being impaled against a tree got the censors upset. To be fair, American standards for violence in children's cartoons might be even stricter now than in the 00s, considering that violent children's action cartoons have been purged from cable and are only on streaming. Inuyasha had to be aimed at an older audience because the tolerance for violence in American children's media is substantially lower than Japan's.
It probably wasn't on anyone's radar, unlike Dragon Ball. The early DB chapters got the publisher into hot water at the time due to it being stocked at Toys 'R Us alongside innocuous fare, which was rare for imported manga (sans Pokemon). Inuyasha wasn't marketed to children and its presence in school libraries may have been less common. I mostly remember it being stocked at comic book shops alongside more adult-oriented graphic novels like Akira and Frank Miller stuff.
I think that had more to do with sexual content than violence. In America, it's more corrupting of children to see female Ranma's nipples than any violence on prime time cop shows. America has a zero tolerance policy for nudity in children's media.
Fanservice was definately the draw with Ranma, but I think it had more to do with most of her work being too foreign and weird for a mainstream audience in America at the time (early 1990's, pre-Pokemon era). Urusei Yatsura especially with its reliance on knowledge of Japanese folklore and mythology.
Her work developed a massive underground following early on by adult otaku in the '80s that it made no sense to attempt to Americanize it for children afterward. Inuyasha pretty much only got on TV because there was an anime boom in the early '00s.
 

Light Lucario

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Okay, I've been looking around and trying to find where I found the claim that Yashahime was aimed at a young female audience and it's the reliable, no citation required source known as TVTropes, even attributing this factoid to Rumiko Takahaki, who has little actual creative involvement and using the fact that it is aimed at Pokemon as evidence. There are some violent scenes in Yashahime, but I don't remember as much blood so this claim seemed plausible. I always found the "it's for little girls" something the defenders say rather than detractors. Maybe the inevitable Yashahime manga will prove if it's aimed at a male or female audience.
Knowing what I know about TVTropes, I'm not surprised that people would throw around baseless claims about this series there. Bitter or annoyed fans of any show love to edit in claims like that.

Anyway, I thought that this episode was pretty good. The opening and ending themes are really good and I'm glad that they could air both of them unedited for at least this week. Admittedly, seeing the main cast again would have probably felt a lot more meaningful if I saw more of Inuyasha beyond The Final Act. It was still nice for fans to get another adventure with the main cast and see how they have been doing after the events of the original series. There were some intense moments during the battle, as well as the demon killing people beforehand. It was also nice to hear some of Kirby Morrow's last lines before he tragically passed away last year. I'm sure that getting to hear the original cast again was also a nice treat for fans.

I liked some of the moments between Kagome and Inuyasha. The whole trust issue should be more moot when they are married by this point, but it was cute how Kagome knew that Inuyasha would be there to protect her. The sit boy and nostalgia comment were definitely some more bones for long time fans. Every time Kagome mentioned how all she has to do now is enjoy these days with Inuyasha, I kept thinking that it obviously didn't happen or else we wouldn't have this sequel most likely.

The quick look into the real lead characters was more of a tease for the next episode since we don't know much about them or why they're there. Since the demon turned out to be the same one from this flashback episode, I assume that it's connected to whatever happened to the original cast. I've heard a good amount of this series already, especially from a couple of friends who do really like it, so I might have a decent idea as to how the three leads are like. I don't know if this would be the best way to start out a sequel series, mainly because we don't get a proper introduction to the new leads, but it probably helped to get people talking about the series with it focusing on the original cast for the first episode. Overall, it was a pretty good episode.
 

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